Riv Performance
Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.

The 8th Gen Riviera Resource
 
HomeDashboardLatest imagesSearchRiviera Questions & AnswersWrite-Ups IndexRegisterRelated LinksLog in

 

 Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures

Go down 
3 posters
AuthorMessage
AA
Administrator
AA


Name : Aaron
Age : 45
Location : C-bus, Ohio
Joined : 2007-01-13
Post Count : 18438
Merit : 247

Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty
PostSubject: Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures   Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures EmptyFri Apr 25, 2008 9:17 am


TireRack.com: Brake Pad and Rotor Bed-In Procedures


All brake pads must be bedded-in with the rotor they will be used against to maximize brake performance. The bedding-in process involves a gradual build up of heat in the rotors and pad compound. This process will lay down a thin layer of transfer film on to the rotor surface. Following the bed-in procedures provided by the manufacturer will assure a smooth, even layer of transfer film on the rotor and will minimize brake judder. Here are a few things to keep in mind when installing new rotors and pads:

When installing new pads, the rotors should be new or at least resurfaced to remove any transfer film from the previous set of brake pads.

It is critical that the installer clean any rust, scale, or debris from the hub mounting surface thoroughly and check it for excessive run-out with a dial indicator gauge before installing the rotor.


The new rotor should also be checked for excessive run-out using a dial indicator gauge before the caliper and pads are installed. If a rotor has excessive run-out of over .004" (.10mm) it should be replaced.

If your new rotor has excessive run-out, please contact our customer service department for a replacement rotor. Do not install and drive using the rotor! Rotor manufacturers will not warranty a used rotor for excessive run-out. Running with excessive run-out on the hub or rotor will cause vibration issues.

Failure to follow these procedures may result in brake judder, excessive noise, or other difficulties in bedding-in the new brake pads. The pads need a fresh surface to lay down an even transfer film. Residue from the previous pad compound on the surface or an irregular surface on a used rotor will cause the pads to grip-slip-grip-slip as they pass over the rotor surface under pressure. The resulting vibration will cause noise and telegraph vibrations through the suspension and steering wheel. This vibration is known as brake judder or brake shimmy. This is typically caused by an uneven transfer film on the rotor surface or an uneven surface on the rotor not allowing that transfer film to develop evenly. This is often misdiagnosed as a warped rotor.

Bedding-in new pads and rotors should be done carefully and slowly. Rapid heat build up in the brake system can lead to warped rotors and or glazed brake pads. Most brake pad compounds will take up to 300-400 miles to fully develop an even transfer film on the rotors. Following are the recommended bed-in procedures from each manufacturer:

AKEBONO

400 to 500 miles of moderate driving is recommended. Consumer should avoid heavy braking during this period.

ATE

400 to 500 miles of moderate driving is recommended. Consumer should avoid heavy braking during this period.

BREMBO Gran Turismo

In a safe area, apply brakes moderately from 60mph to 30mph and then drive approximately 1/2 mile to allow the brakes to cool. Repeat this procedure approximately 30 times.

HAWK

After installing new pads make 6 to 10 stops from approximately 35 mph with moderate pressure. Make an additional two to three hard stops from approximately 40 to 45 mph. Do not allow the vehicle to come to a complete stop.When completed with this process, park the vehicle and allow the brakes to cool completely before driving on them again. Do not engage the parking brake until after this cooling process is compete.

NOTE: Hawk racing pads (Blue, Black, HT-10, HT-12) may require a different bed-in procedure. Contact your sales specialists at The Tire Rack for racing application information.

KAZERA

Follow the brake pad manufacturer's recommended break-in procedure taking care not to produce excessive heat in the system. Avoid heavy braking for the first 400-500 miles.

POWER SLOT

Follow the brake pad manufacturer's recommended break-in procedure taking care not to produce excessive heat in the system. Avoid heavy braking for the first 400-500 miles.

SATISFIED

For Gransport GS6 Carbon Ceramic Pads —

Step 1: Make 10 stops from 30 mph (50 kph) down to about 10 mph (15 kph) using moderate braking pressure and allowing approximately 30 seconds between stops for cooling. Do not drag your pads during these stops. After the 10th stop, allow 15 minutes for your braking system to cool down.

Step 2: Make 5 consecutive stops from 50 mph (80 kph) down to 10 mph (15 kph). After the 5th stop, allow your braking system to cool for approximately 30 minutes. This completes the break-in of your pads to the rotor surface.

During Steps 1 & 2, a de-gassing process occurs which may produce an odor coming from your pads as they complete the break-in cycle. This odor is normal and is part of the process your pads must go through to achieve their ultimate level of performance. The odor will go away after allowing your braking system to cool for approximately 30 minutes.

As with any new set of pads, do not tow a trailer or do any hauling during the break-in period.

Full seating of your new brake pads normally occurs within 1,000 miles.

For all other Satisfied pads —

400 to 500 miles of moderate driving is recommended. Consumer should avoid heavy braking during this period.

sourced from tirerack.com: http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/tech/techpage.jsp?techid=85

-----------------------------------------------------

StopTech: Pad and Rotor Bed-In Theory, Definitions and Procedures

Removing the Mystery from Brake Pad Bed-In

by Matt Weiss of StopTech and James Walker, Jr. of scR motorsports

In order for any brake system to work optimally, the rotors and pads must be properly bedded-in, period. This process can also be called break-in, conditioning, or burnishing, but whatever terminology you choose, getting the brakes properly bedded-in and keeping them that way is critical to the peak performance of the entire brake system.

However, understanding why the rotors and pads need to be bedded-in is just as important as the actual process. If one understands what is happening during the bed-in process, they can tailor the process to specific pads, rotors, and/or driving conditions. For this reason, we present this generic bed-in overview pertaining to all brake systems, but follow with links to application-specific bed-in procedures to fit most every set of circumstances.
What is brake pad “bed-in” anyway?
Simply stated, bed-in is the process of depositing an even layer of brake pad material, or transfer layer, on the rubbing surface of the rotor disc. That's it. End of discussion. Ok, not really, but although bed-in is quite basic in definition, achieving this condition in practice can be quite a challenge, and the ramifications of improper or incomplete bed-in can be quite a-a-n-n-o-o-y-y-i-i-n-n-g-g.

Abrasive friction and adherent friction

There are two basic types of brake pad friction mechanisms: abrasive friction and adherent friction . In general, all pads display a bit of each, with abrasive mechanisms dominating the lower temperature ranges while adherent mechanisms come more into play as pad temperature increases. Both mechanisms allow for friction or the conversion of Kinetic energy to Thermal energy, which is the function of a brake system, by the breaking of molecular bonds in vastly different ways.

The abrasive mechanism generates friction or energy conversion by the mechanical rubbing of the brake pad material directly on the rotor disc. In a crystalline sense, the weaker of the bonds in the two different materials is broken. This obviously results in mechanical wear of both the pad and the rotor. Consequently, both pads and rotors are replaced when they are physically worn to their limit and are too thin to endure further service.

The adherent mechanism is altogether different. In an adherent system, a thin layer of brake pad material actually transfers and sticks (adheres) on to the rotor face. The layer of pad material, once evenly established on the rotor, is what actually rubs on the brake pad. The bonds that are broken, for the conversion of Kinetic to Thermal energy, are formed instantaneously before being broken again. It is this brake pad-on-transferred brake pad material interaction on a molecular level that yields the conversion process.

With the adherent mechanism there is much reduced rotor wear as compared to abrasive mechanism, but it's not a free lunch – pads now become the primary wear element in the braking system. And even though rotors are not mechanically worn down with adherent systems, they still will need to be replaced on a regular basis due to cracking reaching a point of failure if they are exposed to intense, repetitive thermal cycling. This is why race teams throw out rotors that are actually as thick or thicker than when they were brand new. It's due to the an adherent brake pad transfer layer!
The all-important transfer layer

As stated above, the objective of the bed-in process is to deposit an even layer of brake pad material, or transfer layer , on the rubbing surface of the rotor disc. Note the emphasis on the word even, as uneven pad deposits on the rotor face are the number one, and almost exclusive cause of brake judder or vibration.

Let's say that again, just so there is no misunderstanding. Uneven pad deposits on the rotor face are the number one, and almost exclusive cause of brake judder or vibration.

It only takes a small amount of thickness variation, or TV, in the transfer layer (we're only talking a few ten thousandths of an inch here) to initiate brake vibration. While the impact of an uneven transfer layer is almost imperceptible at first, as the pad starts riding the high and low spots, more and more TV will be naturally generated until the vibration is much more evident. With prolonged exposure, the high spots can become hot spots and can actually change the metallurgy of the rotor in those areas, creating “hard” spots in the rotor face that are virtually impossible to remove.
Bedding fundamentals

In general, bed-in consists of heating a brake system to its adherent temperature to allow the formation of a transfer layer. The brake system is then allowed to cool without coming to rest, resulting in an even transfer layer deposition around the rotor circumference. This procedure is typically repeated two or three times in order to ensure that the entire rotor face is evenly covered with brake pad material. Sounds easy, right? Well, it can be if you have the proper information.

Because the adherent temperature range for brake pads varies widely (typically 100°F-600°F for street pads and 600°F-1400°F for race pads), each bed-in needs to be application-specific. One could try to generate a one-size-fits-all procedure, but too little heat during bed-in keeps the material from transferring to the rotor face while overheating the system can generate uneven pad deposits due to the material breaking down and splotching (that's a technical term) on to the rotor face.

In summary, the key to a successful bed-in is to bring the pads up to their adherent operating temperature in a controlled manner and keep them there long enough to start the pad material transfer process. Different brake system designs, pad types, and driving conditions require different procedures to successfully accomplish the bed-in. The recommended procedures below should provide you with the information you need to select the bed-in procedure appropriate for your application.

sourced from stoptech.com: http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/wp_bedintheory.shtml


Last edited by AA on Sat Jul 11, 2009 10:24 pm; edited 3 times in total
Back to top Go down
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/657082/4
AA
Administrator
AA


Name : Aaron
Age : 45
Location : C-bus, Ohio
Joined : 2007-01-13
Post Count : 18438
Merit : 247

Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty
PostSubject: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures (Part II)   Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures EmptyFri Apr 25, 2008 9:41 am

Pad and Rotor Bed-In Theory, Definitions and Procedures
StopTech's Recommended Procedure for Bedding-in Stock-Sized & Performance Brake Systems

by Matt Weiss of StopTech and James Walker, Jr. of scR motorsports

When a system has both new rotors and pads, there are two different objectives for bedding-in a performance brake system: heating up the brake rotors and pads in a prescribed manner, so as to transfer pad material evenly onto the rotors; and maturing the pad material, so that resins which are used to bind and form it are ‘cooked' out of the pad.

The first objective is achieved by performing a series of stops, so that the brake rotor and pad material are heated steadily to a temperature that promotes the transfer of pad material onto the brake rotor friction surface. There is one pitfall in this process, however, which must be avoided. The rotor and, therefore, the vehicle should not be brought to a complete stop, with the brakes still applied, as this risks the non-uniform transfer of pad material onto the friction surface.

The second objective of the bedding-in process is achieved by performing another set of stops, in order to mature the pad itself. This ensures that resins which are used to bind and form the pad material are ‘cooked' out of the pad, at the point where the pad meets the rotor's friction surface.

The bed-in process is not complete until both sets of stops have been performed. There's one exception, however. Some pad manufacturers sell ‘race-ready' pads, which have been pre-conditioned by flame heat-treating or laser etching, to provide a mature surface on the pad face. If race-ready pads are being used, then the second set of controlled stops is unnecessary. Also note that the same circumstances exist when a system to be bedded has new rotors and used pads (a strategy that professional teams use to break in their rotors ahead of time) one only has to perform a single set of stops to transfer pad material uniformly onto the new rotor.

Note that, if the brakes of a vehicle with high-performance or racing pads are not used continuously in an aggressive manner, the transfer layer on the rotors can be abraded (literally worn off). However, the transfer layer can be re-established, if needed, by repeating one series of stops in the bed-in procedure. This process may be repeated as often as necessary during the life of the pad.

This characteristic is useful when a system is already bedded-in with one pad friction and another is to be used going forward, like when changing between pad types for the street and track (and then after a track event, back again). The procedure under this case is different, where the new friction is installed and the vehicle is first driven for 5 to 20 miles (8 to 33 Km) with light use, keeping the pad friction and rotor cold. This promotes the abrasive friction mechanism cleaning the rotor surface of the previous pad material before performing either one or two bed-in cycles as prescribed below. One set of stops as outlined, if the pads being installed are used, two if the pads are actually new

The bed-in procedures below outline the steps required to effectively bed-in performance brake systems. We strongly recommend that, in order to complete the bed-in safely, the bed-in procedures be conducted in dry conditions on a race track or other controlled environment, so as not to endanger yourself or others. Please note that we neither recommend nor condone driving at high speeds on public roads. While it is important to get enough heat into the system to effectively bed-in the brakes, it is even more important to exercise common sense at all times, and to conduct the bed-in procedure responsibly.

Bedding-in Street Performance Pads

For a typical performance brake system using street-performance pads, a series of ten partial braking events, from 60mph down to 10mph, will typically raise the temperature of the brake components sufficiently to be considered one bed-in set. Each of the ten partial braking events should achieve moderate-to-high deceleration (about 80 to 90% of the deceleration required to lock up the brakes and/or to engage the ABS), and they should be made one after the other, without allowing the brakes to cool in between.

Depending on the make-up of the pad material, the brake friction will seem to gain slightly in performance, and will then lose or fade somewhat by around the fifth stop (also about the time that a friction smell will be detectable in the passenger compartment). This does not indicate that the brakes are bedded-in. This phenomenon is known as a green fade, as it is characteristic of immature or ‘green' pads, in which the resins still need to be driven out of the pad material, at the point where the pads meet the rotors. In this circumstance, the upper temperature limit of the friction material will not yet have been reached.

As when bedding-in any set of brakes, care should be taken regarding the longer stopping distance necessary with incompletely bedded pads. This first set of stops in the bed-in process is only complete when all ten stops have been performed - not before. The system should then be allowed to cool, by driving the vehicle at the highest safe speed for the circumstances, without bringing it to a complete stop with the brakes still applied. After cooling the vehicle, a second set of ten partial braking events should be performed, followed by another cooling exercise. In some situations, a third set is beneficial, but two are normally sufficient.

Bedding-in Club Race or Full Race Pads

For a typical performance brake system using race pads, the bed-in procedure must be somewhat more aggressive, as higher temperatures need to be reached, in order to bring certain brands of pad material up to their full race potential.

We typically recommend a set of ten partial braking events, from 60mph down to 10mph, followed immediately by three or four partial braking events, from 80mph down to 10mph. Alternately, a set of eleven stops, from 80mph to 40mph, or a set of seven stops, from 100mph to 50mph, would be approximately the same. As with street pads, each of the partial braking events should achieve moderate-to-high deceleration (about 80% of the deceleration required to lock up the brakes and/or to engage the ABS), and they should be made one after the other, without allowing the brakes to cool in between.

Again, depending on the make-up of the pad material, the brake friction will seem to gain slightly in performance, and will then lose or fade somewhat about halfway through the first set of stops. This does not indicate that the brakes are bedded-in, except where race-ready pads are being used. This phenomenon is the same as that which occurs with high-performance or street pads (except that, when race-ready pads are used, they do not exhibit green fade, and they will be bedded-in after just one complete set of stops).

As when bedding-in any set of brakes, care should be taken regarding the longer stopping distance necessary with incompletely bedded pads. This first set of stops in the bed-in process is only complete when the recommended number of stops has been performed - not before. As a general rule, it would be better to perform additional stops, than not enough. The system should then be allowed to cool, by driving the vehicle at the highest safe speed for the circumstances, without bringing it to a complete stop with the brakes still applied.

After cooling the vehicle, a second set of the recommended number of stops should be performed, followed by another cooling exercise. In some situations, a third set is beneficial, but two are normally sufficient.

Racers will note that, when a pad is bedded-in properly, there will be approximately 2mm (0.1 inch) of the pad edge near the rotor, on which the paint will have turned to ash, or the color of the pad will have changed to look as though it has been overheated.

In summary, the key to successfully bedding-in performance brakes is to bring the pads up to their operating temperature range, in a controlled manner, and to keep them there long enough to start the pad material transfer process. Different brake system designs, pad types, and driving conditions require different procedures to achieve a successful bed-in. The procedures recommended above should provide a useful starting point for developing bed-in procedures appropriate to individual applications.

sourced from StopTech's website: http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/wp_bedinperformance.shtml

------------------------------------------------

From Hawk Performance FAQ:

Q: Why should I perform a break-in procedure on new brake pads?
A: Correct brake pad break-in (bedding) is important to assure quality braking performance over the life of the pad. This procedure allows the rubbing surface of the brake pad to slowly be brought up to racing temperatures. Proper bedding creates a transfer layer film of friction material to be applied to the rotor surface. This allows the brake pad material to rub against itself rather than the bare rotor. This increases the stopping performance of the brake pad and can reduce pad and rotor wear.

Q: What is the proper procedure for braking in new brake pads?
A: Brake pad break-in procedure.

1. After reaching medium speed engage brake pedal to slow car without coming to a complete stop. Release pedal quickly and do not drag brakes. Repeat four or five times.
2. At higher speeds engage brake pedal to slow car without coming to a complete stop. Release pedal quickly and do not drag brakes. Repeat five times.
3. At or near race speed engage brake pedal to slow car without coming to a complete stop. Release pedal quickly and do not drag brakes. Repeat three times. Allow a few seconds between brake engagements while car is in motion.
4. Do not hold brake pedal. Park car for approximately 20 minutes or until brake rotors are completely cool to the touch.
5. If during the above steps the brake pedal becomes soft or brake fade is noticed, park the car immediately for approximately 20 minutes. Do not hold brake pedal.

Important reminders:

* Do not attempt to use badly worn or damaged rotors with new brake pads.
* Do not drag brakes while car is moving during break-in procedure.
* Do not engage pedal while car is stopped at any time following the break-in procedure.
* Upon completing the procedure, allow the brake system to completely cool before racing.
* Applying the pedal a few times before the start of the race will allow the brake pads to heat up before attempting to reach race speeds.
* Clean a used rotor surface with fine sand paper or steel wool, rinse with water, dry and install before bedding new pads.
* Some forms of racing don't allow time for the proper break-in procedure to be performed. However, it is still very important to attempt to perform at least the core of the procedure: slow heat build up and complete cool down.

sourced from HawkPerformance.com: http://www.hawkperformance.com/motorsports/faqs.php


Specific Bed-In Procedures for Hawk Pads

For HPS & HP Plus street pads:

1. After installing new brake pads, make 6 to 10 stops from approximately 30-35 mph applying moderate pressure.
2. Make an additional 2 to 3 hard stops from approximately 40 to 45 mph.
3. DO NOT DRAG BRAKES!
4. Allow 15 minutes for brake system to cool down.
5. After step 4 your new pads are ready for use.

For DTC-30 race pads:

1. Seal all brake ducts if applicable.
2. At medium speeds slowly engage brakes 6 to 8 times without coming to a complete stop. DON NOT DRAG BRAKES.
3. Increase speed to simulate race conditions. At near race speed engage the brakes 6 to 8 times without coming to a complete stop. DO NOT DRAG BRAKES.
4. Allow system to cool down by immediately parking the car for 15 minutes or longer. Brakes should reach ambient temperature or cool to touch. Do not engage the brakes during cool down period. Remove duct seals. Brakes are now ready to use.
5. After step 4 your new pads are ready for use.


------------------------------------------------

Bendix: Tips for Brake Noise Prevention

• Disc Brake Hardware: Caliper bolts, sleeves bushings and clips. These must be new or in “like new” condition. Caliper bolts must not be bent and must be torqued to manufacturer specifications. Caliper slides and bushings must be clean and lubricated with the manufacturer-recommended brake caliper lubricant. (Honda recommends Molycote77, Toyota uses P/N 08887-80609.) Clips hold pads in the caliper should be replaced with new ones during every brake job. Make sure to look up and use only the recommended caliper lube procedure. Keep in mind that all manufacturers have very specific lubrication procedures. This lubrication is necessary to prevent vibration-induced noise. Failure to follow these lubrication procedures will result in unwanted brake noise.

• Rotors: Even new rotors should be treated to a non-directional finish. All manufacturers now recommend a non-directional finish on rotors. Rotors should be washed with soap and hot water before installation, as solvent-type cleaners do not remove all machining dust, and because drying with compressed air usually results in oil contamination of the friction material. It is also very important to make sure that the wheel flange behind the rotor is free of any rust or debris. Failure to eliminate rust or debris will cause rotor “run out,” which, over time, will cause friction material to be transferred to the rotor surface. This will eventually cause noise due to extreme variance in rotor thickness. It is also imperative to use an on-car lathe when it is recommended by a car’s manufacturer. Most all manufacturers feel that this is the only way to turn the rotors on vehicles and not produce run out. For example, performing a brake job on a Toyota or Honda vehicle without using an on-car lathe is gambling on a noise-related customer comeback. Honda even states that a new rotor must be turned on the car after it is installed in order to prevent brake vibration.

• Pad Fits in the Anchor: Anchor brackets do wear out. The pad should fit very snug in the anchor bracket. The factory maximum clearance is only .010. Most squeal noise is caused by loose-fitting pads in anchor bracket. (Toyota has Technical Service Bulletins that explain lubrication of pad retaining clip for this reason alone.)

• Proper Pad “Break In” is Critical. Any time you perform a brake job, you should perform 30-50 moderate stops from speeds lower than 40 mph. There should be a minimum of seven tenths of a mile cool down between stops. Excessive heating or hard use when new will cause brake pad glazing and will prevent proper break-in. The proper break in procedure is outlined in your car’s owner manual.

• Proper Lug Nut Torque: Proper lug nut torque cannot be stressed enough! Improper lug nut torque will cause rotor deflection will cause, over time and 2,000 to 3,000 miles, RTV resulting in noise and brake pedal pulsation. Deflection will not manifest itself until mileage has accumulated on the vehicle causing you to believe that the noise is not related to the original brake job. Always use a calibrated torque wrench and look up the proper wheel torque for the vehicle on which you are working.

• Read the Service Procedure and All TSBs for the Vehicle. Import calipers are small and prone to vibration. Manufacturers know this and have published a lot of information on how to prevent noise and vibration on these vehicles. Domestic manufacturers also have many revised brake service procedures that relate to noise prevention. Take time to familiarize yourself with the proper service procedure for the vehicle on which you are working.

sourced from bendixbrakes.com: www.bendixbrakes.com/download/pdf/Tips-for-Brake-Noise-Prevention.pdf

_________________
'05 GTO 6.0L • 6-spd • 95k miles • 0-60: 4.8s • 16.9 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:26

'95 Celica GT 2.2L • 5-spd • 165k miles • 0-60: yes

'98 SC Riviera • 281k miles • 298 HP/370 TQ • 0-60: 5.79s • ET: 13.97 @ 99.28 • 4087 lb • 20.1 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:30
3.4" pulley • AL104 plugs • 180º t-stat • FWI w/K&N • 1.9:1 rockers • OR pushrods • LS6 valve springs • SLP headers • ZZP fuel rails
KYB GR2 struts • MaxAir shocks • Addco sway bars • UMI bushings • GM STB • Enkei 18" EV5s w/ Dunlop DZ101s • F-body calipers
EBC bluestuff/Hawk HP plus • SS lines • Brembo slotted discs • DHP tuned • Aeroforce • Hidden Hitch

^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown

'70 Ninety-Eight Holiday Coupe 455cid • 116k miles
^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown


Last edited by AA on Fri Jan 07, 2011 10:08 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/657082/4
AA
Administrator
AA


Name : Aaron
Age : 45
Location : C-bus, Ohio
Joined : 2007-01-13
Post Count : 18438
Merit : 247

Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty
PostSubject: Re: Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures   Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures EmptySat Jul 11, 2009 9:41 pm

From Zeckhausen Racing, LLC:

Bedding allows your brakes to reach their full potential. Until they are bedded, your brakes simply do not work as well as they can. If you've installed a big brake kit, changed your pads and rotors, or even if you've purchased a brand new car, you should set aside some time to bed the brakes in by following the instructions below. Proper bedding will improve pedal feel, reduce or eliminate brake squeal, and extend the life of your pads and rotors. For more on the theory of bedding, please refer to this excellent article by StopTech: Removing the Mystery from Brake Pad Bed-In.

Caution: After installing new pads/rotors or a big brake kit, the first few applications of the brake pedal will result in almost no braking power. Gently apply the brakes a few times at low speed in order to build up some grip before blasting down the road at high speed. Otherwise, you may be in for a nasty surprise the first time you hit the brakes at 60 mph.

If you have just installed rotors with zinc or cadmium plating, or if the rotors have an anti-corrosion phosphate coating, you should postpone the bedding process until normal driving has allowed your brake pads to polish the rotors clean and removed all traces of the plating or coating.

Read and understand these instructions completely before starting. If you have any questions, give us a call or email. Do not substitute higher speeds for the 60mph called for in these instructions. The heat in your brakes goes up exponentially as you increase the speed from which you brake. If you make repeated stops from 80 or 90mph with street pads, you will overheat the brakes and may end up having to replace pads and/or rotors.

When following these instructions, avoid other vehicles. Bedding is often best done early in the morning, when traffic is light, since other drivers will have no idea what you are up to and will respond in a variety of ways ranging from fear to curiosity to aggression. A police officer will probably not understand when you try to explain why you were driving erratically! Zeckhausen Racing does not endorse speeding on public roads and takes no responsibility for any injuries or tickets you may receive while following these instructions.

1. From a speed of 60mph, gently apply the brakes a couple of times to bring them up to operating temperature. This prevents you from thermally shocking the rotors and pads in the next steps.

2. Make a series of eight near-stops from 60 to about 10 mph. Do it HARD by pressing the brakes firmly, but do not lock the wheels or engage ABS. At the end of each slowdown, immediately accelerate back to 60mph and then apply the brakes again. DO NOT COME TO A COMPLETE STOP! If you stop completely and sit there with your foot on the brake pedal, you will imprint pad material onto the hot rotors, which could lead to vibration, uneven braking, and even ruin the rotors.

3. The brakes may begin to fade after the 7th or 8th near-stop. This fade will stabilize, but not completely go away until the brakes have fully cooled. A strong smell from the brakes, and even smoke, is normal.

4. After the 8th near-stop, accelerate back up to speed and cruise for a while, using the brakes as little as possible. The brakes need about 5 minutes to cool down. Try not to become trapped in traffic or come to a complete stop while the brakes are still very hot.

5. If race pads, such as Hawk DTC-70 or Performance Friction 01 are being used, add four near-stops from 80 to 10mph.

6. After the break-in cycle, there should be a slight blue tint and a light gray film on the rotor face. The blue tint tells you the rotor has reached break-in temperature and the gray film is pad material starting to transfer onto the rotor face. This is what you are looking for. The best braking occurs when there is an even layer of of pad material deposited across the face of the rotors. This minimizes squealing, increases braking torque, and maximizes pad and rotor life.

7. After the first break in cycle shown above, the brakes may still not be fully broken in. A second bed-in cycle, AFTER the brakes have cooled down fully from the first cycle, may be necessary before the brakes really start to perform well. This is especially true if you have installed new pads on old rotors. If you've just installed a big brake kit, the pedal travel may not feel as firm as you expected. After the second cycle, the pedal will become noticeably firmer. If necessary, bleed the brakes to improve pedal firmness.

source: http://www.zeckhausen.com/bedding_in_brakes.htm

_________________
'05 GTO 6.0L • 6-spd • 95k miles • 0-60: 4.8s • 16.9 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:26

'95 Celica GT 2.2L • 5-spd • 165k miles • 0-60: yes

'98 SC Riviera • 281k miles • 298 HP/370 TQ • 0-60: 5.79s • ET: 13.97 @ 99.28 • 4087 lb • 20.1 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:30
3.4" pulley • AL104 plugs • 180º t-stat • FWI w/K&N • 1.9:1 rockers • OR pushrods • LS6 valve springs • SLP headers • ZZP fuel rails
KYB GR2 struts • MaxAir shocks • Addco sway bars • UMI bushings • GM STB • Enkei 18" EV5s w/ Dunlop DZ101s • F-body calipers
EBC bluestuff/Hawk HP plus • SS lines • Brembo slotted discs • DHP tuned • Aeroforce • Hidden Hitch

^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown

'70 Ninety-Eight Holiday Coupe 455cid • 116k miles
^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown
Back to top Go down
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/657082/4
Rickw
Guru



Name : Rick
Location : Lancaster, MA
Joined : 2008-09-13
Post Count : 6281
Merit : 117

Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty
PostSubject: Re: Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures   Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures EmptySat Jul 11, 2009 10:09 pm

AA,
Can you add this to the "Write Up" section
Back to top Go down
AA
Administrator
AA


Name : Aaron
Age : 45
Location : C-bus, Ohio
Joined : 2007-01-13
Post Count : 18438
Merit : 247

Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty
PostSubject: Re: Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures   Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures EmptySat Jul 11, 2009 10:23 pm

Sure, will do.

_________________
'05 GTO 6.0L • 6-spd • 95k miles • 0-60: 4.8s • 16.9 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:26

'95 Celica GT 2.2L • 5-spd • 165k miles • 0-60: yes

'98 SC Riviera • 281k miles • 298 HP/370 TQ • 0-60: 5.79s • ET: 13.97 @ 99.28 • 4087 lb • 20.1 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:30
3.4" pulley • AL104 plugs • 180º t-stat • FWI w/K&N • 1.9:1 rockers • OR pushrods • LS6 valve springs • SLP headers • ZZP fuel rails
KYB GR2 struts • MaxAir shocks • Addco sway bars • UMI bushings • GM STB • Enkei 18" EV5s w/ Dunlop DZ101s • F-body calipers
EBC bluestuff/Hawk HP plus • SS lines • Brembo slotted discs • DHP tuned • Aeroforce • Hidden Hitch

^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown

'70 Ninety-Eight Holiday Coupe 455cid • 116k miles
^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown
Back to top Go down
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/657082/4
98riv
Moderator



Location : USA
Joined : 2007-01-14
Post Count : 995
Merit : 30

Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty
PostSubject: Re: Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures   Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures EmptyFri Jul 23, 2010 2:18 pm

Here is a good video I found that talks about how to bed-in the brakes. http://www.essexparts.com/learning-center/Bed-in?v=1. There is a link below the video for a shorter version.


_________________
1998 Supercharged Riviera - Custom CAI, Alpine spx-13ref, Infinity 6x9's, Alpine 4 Channel Amp, Kicker KX3, Silverstars, STB, Hawk Brake Pads, Monroe Air Shocks, KYB GR2
Back to top Go down
AA
Administrator
AA


Name : Aaron
Age : 45
Location : C-bus, Ohio
Joined : 2007-01-13
Post Count : 18438
Merit : 247

Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty
PostSubject: Re: Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures   Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures EmptySat Jul 24, 2010 2:48 am

Excellent video posted above by 98riv. This confirms what StopTech and other high-end pad makers have been telling us: proper bed-in (burnishing) is extremely important for getting the most high-speed braking performance, especially when it comes to the performance street and race pad compounds. Not surprising, as the guy hosting in the video worked for StopTech before moving the Essex.

_________________
'05 GTO 6.0L • 6-spd • 95k miles • 0-60: 4.8s • 16.9 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:26

'95 Celica GT 2.2L • 5-spd • 165k miles • 0-60: yes

'98 SC Riviera • 281k miles • 298 HP/370 TQ • 0-60: 5.79s • ET: 13.97 @ 99.28 • 4087 lb • 20.1 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:30
3.4" pulley • AL104 plugs • 180º t-stat • FWI w/K&N • 1.9:1 rockers • OR pushrods • LS6 valve springs • SLP headers • ZZP fuel rails
KYB GR2 struts • MaxAir shocks • Addco sway bars • UMI bushings • GM STB • Enkei 18" EV5s w/ Dunlop DZ101s • F-body calipers
EBC bluestuff/Hawk HP plus • SS lines • Brembo slotted discs • DHP tuned • Aeroforce • Hidden Hitch

^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown

'70 Ninety-Eight Holiday Coupe 455cid • 116k miles
^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown
Back to top Go down
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/657082/4
AA
Administrator
AA


Name : Aaron
Age : 45
Location : C-bus, Ohio
Joined : 2007-01-13
Post Count : 18438
Merit : 247

Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty
PostSubject: Re: Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures   Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures EmptyThu Apr 04, 2013 6:52 pm

Memorandum from Brembo regarding new rotor brake/bed-in:

NOTE: it is very important to follow proper brake bedding procedure following installation. This is necessary not only for optimum performance of the system, but also to avoid onset of judder (vibrations felt through brake and steering).

The discs are delivered with a thin zinc coating to prevent corrosion. Prior to beginning the bedding procedure, this plating must be removed from the braking surfaces by driving the car slowly (under 30 mph) and performing very light brake applications in order to remove the plating without generating heat. With too much heat or pedal pressure, this plating can be deposited unevenly on the disc, and impregnated into the pad, further increasing the likelihood of judder development. Once a visual inspection of the braking surfaces confirms that the plating has been evenly removed, begin with the bedding procedure and specified below.

• Drive the vehicle to a remote area and perform at least 30 brake applications of 3 second duration. Use light/medium deceleration with varying starting speeds. Leave at least 1/2 mile between each brake application.
• The purpose of this procedure is to gradually increase the temperature in the components without thermal shock, and to mate the brake pad and disc friction surfaces.
• After the repeated stops, drive the vehicle for several miles with little or now braking in order to adequately cool the components.
• The system is now ready for normal use.

NOTE: this entire procedure must be completed before driving the vehicle as normal. It is especially important that this process is completed before any extended same-speed driving is done (i.e. freeway travel). Failure to follow these instructions greatly increases the likelihood of judder development.

_________________
'05 GTO 6.0L • 6-spd • 95k miles • 0-60: 4.8s • 16.9 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:26

'95 Celica GT 2.2L • 5-spd • 165k miles • 0-60: yes

'98 SC Riviera • 281k miles • 298 HP/370 TQ • 0-60: 5.79s • ET: 13.97 @ 99.28 • 4087 lb • 20.1 avg MPG • Nelson Ledges Lap: 1:30
3.4" pulley • AL104 plugs • 180º t-stat • FWI w/K&N • 1.9:1 rockers • OR pushrods • LS6 valve springs • SLP headers • ZZP fuel rails
KYB GR2 struts • MaxAir shocks • Addco sway bars • UMI bushings • GM STB • Enkei 18" EV5s w/ Dunlop DZ101s • F-body calipers
EBC bluestuff/Hawk HP plus • SS lines • Brembo slotted discs • DHP tuned • Aeroforce • Hidden Hitch

^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown

'70 Ninety-Eight Holiday Coupe 455cid • 116k miles
^^^ SOLD ^^^ frown
Back to top Go down
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/657082/4
Sponsored content





Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty
PostSubject: Re: Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures   Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures Empty

Back to top Go down
 
Write-Up: Brake Pad Bed-In Procedures
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Write-Up: F-Body Brake Mod
» Write-Up: OEM Front Brakes Pad & Rotor Maintenance
» Write-Up: Brake Line Repair
» E-brake, Parking Brake will not reset to home position!!
» Write-Up: GXP Brake Caliper + Rotor Conversion

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Riv Performance ::   General Tech :: Brakes & Suspension-
Jump to: